Senior Spotlight: Reflecting on Seniors’ Experiences in the English Department and Post-Graduation Plans

Senior Spotlight: Reflecting on Seniors’ Experiences in the English Department and Post-Graduation Plans

Graduating college means taking a full leap into the real world, and these graduating seniors are taking the plunge with the skills they gained from the English department. See how these students plan to conquer life after Clemson:

Jenny Horton

What are you doing post-graduation? If you’re going to graduate school, what would you like to do afterwards?

After graduating from Clemson, I am planning to attend law school at Wake Forest University! Right now I’m interested in practicing health law or intellectual property law.

How do you think your degree has prepared you for your future plans?

I think my English major has prepared me for my future plans by teaching me how to read and think critically. I’ve always loved to read, but, as an English major, I’ve learned how to read with a more analytical mindset. I’ve also gotten really comfortable asking questions (both of my professors and classmates), which I think is a really important part of the learning process.

What classes (specifically English) impacted you the most in your decision for post-grad plans?

Wow, so many! A wide variety of English courses impacted my decision to attend law school. Dr. Hunter and Dr. LeMahieu’s American literature courses got me interested in women’s experiences both in and beyond American literature. And Dr. Hooley’s Environmental Poetry class taught me a lot about the relationship between law/policy and people’s lived experiences. Each of these professors’ classes helped shape my intellectual interests and professional goals in some way.

What do you think was the most valuable thing you learned as an English major?

The most valuable thing I learned as an English major was how to communicate with others and understand a piece of writing from multiple points of view, even if they were different from my own. While my professors taught me an immense amount of material over the past four years, so did my classmates! As a Clemson English major, I’ve learned how to listen and communicate thoughtfully with my peers and professors through writing and discussion, and I think these important skills will serve me well both personally and professionally in the future. Go Tigers!

Ava Dukes

What are you doing post-graduation? If you’re going to graduate school, what would you like to do afterwards?  

I currently work with students in the Pickens County School District and will be attending graduate school in the fall! I will be attending The Ohio State University to pursue a MA in Higher Education and Student Affairs.

How do you think your degree has prepared you for your future plans?

I believe my degree has prepared me to think critically and analytically about the world that we live in, as well as challenge systems. The works that we read and study really help us grapple with real life issues. am particularly interested in diversity, inclusion, and multicultural education. My classes have helped me learn so much about history, culture, and language that impacts higher education.

How might you use it in your future career? Will you?

Clear and meaningful communication is essential for all careers! My degree will allow me to better understand, communicate, and advocate for better ethos’s and systems in higher education.

What classes (specifically English) impacted you the most in your decision for post-grad plans?

I’d say American Revolution: The Remix with Dr. Manganelli and Frankenstein & Other Human Progeny with Dr. Goss impacted me the most.

What do you think was the most valuable thing you learned as an English major?

Never underestimate the value of your thoughts and words.Written and verbal expression are great ways of understanding and creating change! It is important to recognize that all perspectives, voices, and ideas matter. Step out of the box, make something unique, and trust the ability of art to portray truth. My professors always gave us an opportunity to explore works and our own thoughts without limitations and it truly was a highlight of my Clemson experience.

Madeleine Galbreath

What are you doing post-graduation? If you’re going to graduate school, what would you like to do afterwards?  

After graduation, I’m going to take some time to save up money before applying to law school.

How do you think your degree has prepared you for your future plans?

I think being an English major has helped me develop crucial skills for my future profession. In law school, and in the workforce, it is necessary to read analytically and write efficiently, and the workload I have endured has greatly strengthened these abilities.

What classes (specifically English) impacted you the most in your decision for post-grad plans?

This semester, I took Postcolonial and World Literatures (ENGL 4190) with Dr. Angela Naimou and I was exposed to a lot of ethical questions relating to the treatment of people based on gender and race. Our class focused on the recreation of the Antigone story around the world, and its modern day implications in South America. Through these conversations surrounding immigration and conflicts between citizens and the state, I have become very interested in immigration law, which solidified my decision to apply to law school.

What do you think was the most valuable thing you learned as an English major?

The most valuable thing I have learned as an English major was time management skills. If I hadn’t quickly learned how to use my time effectively, I would never have been able to complete all of the work. I think it will serve me well as I join the workforce.


Written By: Madison Rysdon

04/29/19

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