Ask an English Professor: Maria Bose and Kimberly Manganelli

Ask an English Professor: Maria Bose and Kimberly Manganelli


Teaching curriculum ranging from Shakespeare to Screenwriting, Clemson English professors are incredibly well-versed in a variety of subjects. Whether English majors focus their studies on writing and publication or on literature, Clemson’s professors are passionate about English and always prepared for educating their students. We sat down with two professors in the English department, Dr. Maria Bose and Dr. Kimberly Manganelli, to ask them a few questions. Bose’s research interests include new media, contemporary warfare, racial formation, and C21 US culture. Manganelli’s include 19th century British and American literature, racial identity, 18th century British literature, and the history of the novel.

Dr. Maria Bose

What is your fall playlist?

I’ve been really into a Norwegian metal band called Kvelertak recently. I also really like Charlotte Gainsbourg’s album, “Rest.”

What are you currently reading?

I’m in the process of working on a project about Hollywood films regarding the war on terror, so I am reading a lot about that. I am also reading lots of theories about American exceptionalism. I’m watching “Billions” and “Succession” currently as well, just to throw out some TV suggestions.

What drove you to work in the field of English?

Originally, I was on the pre-med track during undergrad at Stanford. But after taking two literature courses for fun, I enjoyed the classes so much that I decided to get my Ph.D. in Literature at UC Irvine.

Dr. Kimberly Manganelli

What is your fall playlist?

Beyoncé is always on the playlist! But I’m also listening to Alabama Shakes, Tanerélle, SZA, and Nina Simone. When I drive my son to school, he always requests Christina Aguilera and Missy Elliott’s “Car Wash” from “A Shark’s Tale,” which makes me wish for new music from Missy E.

What are you currently reading?

I just finished rereading Gillian Flynn’s “Sharp Objects” after watching the HBO series. It’s deliciously dark and far more disturbing than “Gone Girl.” I’m also alternating between Sarah Waters’ “The Little Stranger” and Anne Rice’s “The Witching Hour” both of which feature ghosts, secrets, and the occasional demon tucked away in the dark corners of old family homes.

What drove you to work in the field of English?

It started with reading “Wuthering Heights” as a high school student. As my current reading list shows, I haven’t strayed that far from my Victorian Gothic roots. But these days, I’m also obsessed with the ways in which our country continues to be haunted by our history of slavery.


 

caroline-cavendish

Written By: Caroline Cavendish
10/3/2018

 

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